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The Case Against the Global Economy and For a Turn Toward the Local
by Jerry Mander, Edward Goldsmith (editors)

AVAILABILITY: Usually ships within 1-2 weeks

Publication Date: 1996
Publisher: Sierra Club Books
Binding: Paperback
Topics: Agriculture, Bioregions, Biotechnology, Computers / Internet, Corporate Rule, Democracy: Theory & Practice, Economics, Education, Family / Parenting, Human Health & Welfare, Labor & Work / Classism, Mexico, Nature, Social Movements, Sustainable Community, Third World Peoples

Description: Expressed in such new institutions as GATT, NAFTA, the World Trade Organizations, and Maastricht, as well as by the development schemes of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, economic globalization has been bulldozed through legislative bodies throughout the world, with scant public debate or discourse. These tremendous changes are hailed by their backers as leading to a new era of prosperity and peace, but is this true? Now, for the first time, we have a comprehensive point-by-point analysis of the workings of the global economy, its premises, and its dire implications told by more than forty of the world's leading social, environmental, and economic thinkers from the Americas, Europe, Asia, and the Pacific. They charge that "free trade" and economic globalization create exactly the opposite results from what is promised. Each of the 43 chapters in 'The Case Against the Global Economy' takes one part of the story and delves into it, to show both the root assumptions of globalism and its multiple failures. In the end, it is clear that we need to reverse course - away from the global toward a revitalization of local political and economic control, self-sufficiency, and ecological health.

Review(s): "The contributors to this handbook - among them Jeremy Rifkin, Ralph Nader, Kirkpatrick Sale, Wendell Berry, Richard Barnet, William Greider, ecological economist Herman Daly and World Bank environmental adviser Robert Goodland - argue that the rush toward economic globalization, based on free trade' and deregulation, is both harmful and reversible. Its consequences, they contend, include overcrowded cities, widening of the gap between rich and poor, lowering of wages while prices soar, destruction of wilderness, flattening of local traditions and cultures. The contributors recommend pursuing the opposite path - promoting greater economic localization through cooperatives and small companies that cater to local or regional markets. Essays deal with corporate control of the media and of financial markets; biotechnology's patenting of life forms as neocolonialist exploitation; the worldwide small-farm movement; the emergence of local currencies, barter and work exchange networks; and how global trade agreements (NAFTA, GATT) override decisions on worker safety and environmental standards made democratically by member nations. An important, vital resource for planetary stewardship. Mander ('In the Absence of the Sacred') co-founded the International Forum on Globalization; Goldsmith is a founding editor of Britain's Ecologist." - Publishers Weekly



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